Do Kangaroos Share Some Resemblance With Rodents?

Kangaroos are marsupial mammals, while rodents are placental mammals. It is believed that the one was not a derivative of the other, meaning that the two, marsupials and placental mammals developed independently, hence there is no cross-over within their clade. As already stated the do have some similarities in appearance and traits as they are both mammals, but from an evolutionary perspective they are quite removed from each other. Kangaroos are more closely related to koalas and possums.

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Kangaroos are Marsupials ,broadly speaking Marsupials are mammals who have a pouch to carry their young upto a certain age . Marsupials are mostly native to Australia and New Zealand. Rodents on the other hand are manmals and can be recognized by their ever growing long front teeth. They have fur and many rodents have long tails and snouts like kangaroos. They also share characteristics because they are mammals.  However they are not very closely related because rodents are placental mammals and kangaroos are marsupials.

Rodents are placental mammals and kangaroos are marsupials. The two are not even remotely related despite the fact that they occasionally resemble one another. (source : www.quora.com) 

Kangaroo rats are rodents that hop on their hind legs just like a marsupial kangaroo. However, the two are not related. In Australia, marsupials are the most common type of mammal. Kangaroos, wombats and koalas are all examples of different marsupials from Australia. The kangaroo rat is native to the western United States. (source : www.reference.com)

Kangaroo rat, (genus Dipodomys), any of 22 species of bipedal North American desert rodents with a tufted tail. Kangaroo rats have large heads and eyes, short forelimbs, and very long hind legs and feet. Fur-lined external cheek pouches open alongside the mouth and can be everted for cleaning. Kangaroo rats are considered medium-sized, weighing 35 to 180 grams (1.2 to 6.3 ounces), with a body 10 to 20 cm (4 to 8 inches) long and a tail of similar length. Fur is soft, dense, and silky and ranges in colour from sandy to dark brown with white facial markings, a white strip on each hip, and white underparts. The hairy tail bears a prominent white or brown tuft and balances the body during movement. Kangaroo rats hop on their hind legs up to 2 metres (6.6 feet) at a bound and use their forelegs only when traversing short distances. They keep their fur clean by bathing in fine sand; without this relief, they develop body sores and matted fur.
Kangaroo rats excavate burrows either below the surface of the ground or within large mounds of earth; some species construct nests. Although they are desert dwellers, most species are good swimmers. They seldom drink water, obtaining sufficient moisture from their diet of seeds, stems, buds, fruit, and insects. Chisel-toothed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys microps) are one of the few mammals that can eat the salty leaves of the saltbush, which is common in the Great Basin. Peeling the skin from each leaf with their lower front teeth, they consume the underlying layers, which are rich in water and nutrients. Kangaroo rats forage at night and transport food in their cheek pouches to store either in the burrow or in shallow pits nearby. No kangaroo rats hibernate; instead, they depend upon cached food during the winter. After about a month’s gestation, one or more litters per year of two to five young are born.
Found in western North America from southern Canada to southern Mexico, kangaroo rats prefer well-drained sandy or gravelly soils in a variety of open, sparsely vegetated, hot and dry habitats such as chaparral and sagebrush, desert grassland, mixed grass- and scrubland, and piƱon-juniper woodland. The Texas kangaroo rat (D. elator) constructs burrows in disturbed areas along fencerows and pasture roads and around stock corrals, barns, and grain-storage facilities. Recently, accelerated transformation of desert habitats by residential and agricultural development has imperiled several species of kangaroo rat.
Kangaroo rats are classified in the family Heteromyidae (Greek: “other mice,” or “different mice”) rather than with the “true” mice (family Muridae) within the order Rodentia. Their closest living relatives are kangaroo mice and pocket mice, both of which are also heteromyids. Pocket gophers (family Geomyidae) are related to the family Heteromyidae. The kangaroo rat’s evolutionary history began during the Late Miocene Epoch (11.2 million to 5.3 million years ago) in North America. (source : https://www.britannica.com/animal/kangaroo-rat)